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's right, doing his duty. >>> hello, everyone. don lemon here, top of the hour. you're in the cnn "newsroom." >>> a senior navy s.e.a.l. officer dead in afghanistan. commander job w. price, leader of s.e.a.l. team 4 was found dead yesterday by members of his unit. the initial conclusion is that price committed suicide. the navy's investigating. stay with cnn for more details from our pentagon correspondent in just a minute. >>> more than 100 people were killed in syria today. civilians doing nothing more than waiting in line for bread. witnesses say a syrian military aircraft dropped bombs on this small village and hit a bakery where scores of people were gathered trying to get desperately-needed food. witnesses say the hospitals cannot handle all the casualties. >>> the people of egypt give a thumbs up to a new constitution drawn up by the country's most islamist assembly. this weekend was the second round of a nationwide referendum. the new constitution adjusts the leadership positions and clarifies how the country's laws are made. we'll know the final results in just a few hours. >>> hou
in the book is our entrepreneurial culture that allows us to have the advantage. i don't mean the entrepreneur at the top, the steve jobs model or the great industrialists. what i mean is that companies that do well in the manufacturing space listen to the ideas of their employees, and are encouraging employees to come up with efficiencies this production to figure out how to assemble things more efficiently or how to make products that are more innovative, and they are soliciting those ideas. here is where i think a lot of the traditional critique on manufacturing misses the mark. robert rice, who makes the argument that there's knowledge worth -- people like lawyers, my profession, doctors, bankers, who are knowledge workers, and then there's manufacturers, and they completely miss the idea of modern manufacturing. modern manufacturing requires a lot of knowledge. these are people who are thinkers, who are innovating, and lawyers, i tell you, require a lot of repetitive work. people who say lawyers, you know, we draft documents, templates, and it's repettive. distinction is artificial, and t
to barbra streisand's website for all things barbra. don't wait so long next time. it took me 47 years to get you in front of me. >> really? >> i'm 47. >> lovely to see you. >> nice to see you. >> the great barbra streisand. >> lovely to see you. the great barbara streisand. >>> hello, i'm don lemon, let's get you up to speed now, a shocking number of dead and wounded today in a small village in syria. look at the street covered with bodies and terrified survivors. witnesses say people were standing in lines for bread when a syrian military jet bombed the bakery where they were waiting. more than 100 people were reported dead. that number may go way up as night goes on. a full report from the region in just a moment here on cnn. >>> nine days left before you face a new year with higher taxes. apparently a fiscal cliff solution is not wrapped up as a gift under your christmas tree. lawmakers are home for the holidays. house speaker john boehner is in ohio, president obama is in his native hawaii. you'll hear about a last ditch effort that may happen after the holiday. that story just a
not be better in the morning, you don't know. consider that it will be. the first and the last were optimism. it all deals with creating an image of confidence with an organization. you can do anything or we're great. you don't believe it? let's make it happen. >> people talk about how america is in certain collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washi
somewhere in the middle of where both parties stand. and we also know that if we don't act, 100% of the american people are going to start feeling an impact of higher taxes. i honestly don't worry about the millionaires and billionaires at all. i don't worry about the people who are fine, who don't even really know or care that much about a tax hike that takes them back to the clinton years when they did very well. i don't worry about those folks. i worry about the folks in the middle. and there are always arguments about what is that line? and some say the middle class is at $75,000, some say $150,000, some even go higher because there are states like my state that are very high cost-of-living states. but we know, if we're going to get a deal, we're going to have to meet somewhere in the middle. to me, if we fail, it will be a very, very sad moment in history. and i hear a lot of talk about the sequester. well, mr. president, i don't know exactly how you voted, but i want to say that i voted for a sequester, if we couldn't find savings as part of a debt limit deal. and i'm not
but it that it doesn't factor into the intellectual decision i don't think. >> very well put. i was just going to say that i would like to echo just a little bit of that and the separatioseparatio n of the military and the civilian populace is something i talk about at other times so i think that's, if you don't live in north carolina or texas or southern california, and they'll see people in uniform it was true from a growing up in buffalo new york and i got my rtc scholarship in 1995 so that was a very different culture and time. it's not that long ago but 9/11 really did change so many things and i thought i wanted to be an astronaut. i thought i was going to do all these other things but i went to school between the invasions of afghanistan and iraq and i knew exact to what i was signing up for and i wanted to do it anyway. that would make me the same as young men between the age of 16 and 30, for the last 5 million years. the consequences just are not there. there is this part of the brain that has the self-preservation instinct and i was born without it. maybe all the other guys i worked with w
they verve us. not the other way around. we don't work to make their lives better. they are supposed to make ours better. the operative word here being work. so much doesn't seem to be working though at all inside the beltway. posturing and puffery replace policy and principle. how often did the fiscal cliff even come up during the presidential debate? presumably we could have worked on this problem before now with just a few days left in the year? no wonder so many people are tuning out of politics all together these days because it always seems to be zero some gain with the taxpayers left holding the bag. they are the ones forced to turn over more of their hard earned money to a system that seems utterly incapable of proper management. so thanks, mr. president, for coming back to washington. let's hope it's for real work not just for the show of it. the per pettial razzle dazzle as i like to call it the first lady and the obama daughters, lucky them, are staying on the island, and that's estimated to cost the taxpayers as much as $200,000. apparently president obama's statement that we're
. will happen tonight to work on a fiscal cliff deal. don't wait for washington to reach a deal by the end of the year. coming up, what you can do right now to minimize the impact on your own bottom line. >>> jessica simpson used the holiday to confirm she is pregnant once again. she tweetd a picture of her 7-month-old daughter maxwell with the words "big sis." >>> in mobile, alabama, for us this morning, jim cantore. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, savannah. storm prediction center said we had as many as 34 tornadoes yesterday. average for the month of december is 26. church behind me here heavily damaged, two sections of the roof have been torn off and dropped below. christmas morning, that church was full of people and parishioners attending christmas service. power poles have been taken down as well. the last thing people in mobile expected on christmas day was to be cleaning up after a tornado. >> oh, my god! look at that. >> reporter: this was the scene in downtown mobile, alabama, late tuesday afternoon, a tornado touched down in the city of about 200,000. >> oh, wow! check
. this is the biggest story in afghanistan and the last ten years. we don't hear about it. why? because the fact that more afghans today have access and know how to read or write, when a decade ago they would have had to walk 700 miles to make a phone call. but that's not a story. what is a story? it is a big story. i would imagine it is something that means a lot to them in terms of their key devotees. but what is even more exciting, you think about when we build the railroads, there's a lot about this, a lot of movies made. what happens when you build a railroad when they land on the other side of the railroad and the station gets valuable. you can provide services now that you couldn't provide before. so, it is the next generation. it's when we start to build on the new site of this telecommunications highway. mobile health, mobile banking. a whole a ray of services that we can now deliver because we are connected using this frontier technology. and that is such a powerful, powerful thing. it will have legs for the next 20 years, not to mention everything else that my friend talks about in hi
out. >> throughout the course of the segment. >> you'll be able to tell. we don't know. >> more on the eggnog in a second. you had a planes, trains and automobile situation this holiday season? >> i had a very exciting christmas. i was going to fly to vermont. >> right. >> something happened. we ended up driving six hours, due to a little situation at the airport. that was interesting. >> weren't able to board your plane? >> that's right. there was an accident on the highway. we were late. they wouldn't let me come on with the big bag full of christmas presents so we had to drive. >> where's the spirit? >> i don't know. i don't know. it's actually on the highway heading north. >> you got where you were going? >> we did. we did. we had some adventures. it's always an adventure at the guthrie household. i'm not sure that i should spill it. what about your holidays? >> i don't know. that sounds very interesting. the eggnog is spiced, by the way. my older son really wanted a wand. he told me he needs to go back to santa and give him a new letter because it doesn't come with instruct
in egypt and i thought if i don't get myself there, i'm never going. i'm going to be like moses having seen the land that never entered. [laughter] and i made a reservation with the mileage i had. i decided instead of doing some dumb sure, i would rent an apartment for a few months and just take my work with me, since i write, i could do that, which i did. i did know anyone there. i didn't have one in. i have teams, i didn't know anybody. and as i said i ended up going during a war, but it wasn't even sure what was going to happen. i stayed because i love it and it didn't need to come back. i mean, i would come back to work every few months, but i met somebody good friends. i have more good friends there that ahead in california. i have kids in california and family. i don't know what happened and why i'm still there, quite frankly. it's just that, i can tell you i haven't mastered the language which is one of the great failures of my life, but i still don't want to leave. but as far as what people think, first of all, you go into israel. there are million kinds of jews. there's any kind of
for a meeting on friday. if they can't reach a deal, taxes go up on all of us. plus, don't forget the impact on your 401k. audrey barns joins us with the latest. >> reporter: everyone involved in a meeting between republican and democratic leaders described it as productive, yet it didn't produce an agreement and there are two days left to get it done to avoid automatic tax hikes and across-the-board spending cuts. lawmakers involved in the white house summit vowed to keep chipping away at the sticking points to reach a deal. while senate minority leader mitch mcconnell struck an optimistic tone, senate majority leader harry reid sounded cautious, warning americans whatever they come up with by sunday won't be perfect. after the meeting, president obama made it clear failure is not an option. >> if we don't see an agreement between the two leaders and the senate, i expect a beam to -- bill to go on the floor, and i have asked senator reid to do this, put a bill on the floor that taxes on the middle class families don't go up, that unemployment insurance is available for 2 million people, and
. i don't see myself like that. >> barbra streisand, the way she is, a funny girl. this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> people ask me who i would most like to have on my show as a guest one name pops up in my mind. she's a fabulous actress with a truly iconic voice, a voice that i believe is the greatest there's ever been. she's a humanitarian, a political activist, a wife, a mother, she's a funny girl. she is, of course, barbra streisan i even got the name right. >> did you say bah-bra? >> i said barbra. >> i got the last name right. we had dinner today, and you kept lecturing me. streisand. >> [ english accent ] by god, you've got it. >> i have come from watching your brilliant new movie "guilt trip." the reason why i loved it, it reminded me exactly what it would be like if i went on a road trip with my mother. it's you and seth rogen. you go on this bizarre, crazy road trip together. you're the archetypal jewish momma, and he's the archetypal only son, and chaos ensues. let's watch a clip. >> hey, i'm over here. >> hey, mom. i see you. all of new york sees you. hey, there. hi,
's ran paul country. he is very mindful of that. i don't think he is in a position right now to cut any kind of deal that would invite a problem for himself at home. >> all right. when we hear senator john barosso saying he thinks the president is eager to go over the cliff because it's going to get some some type of political victory, does anybody inside the white house really feel that way that this is, in general, a political victory for the president or democrats in general? >> i do think that people in the white house -- the president's advisors and even the president think they have the upper hand, thomas. polls show that generally speaking, if we do go over the cliff most folks will sort of blame republicans. i think the white house is using that as their lerchlg. i think also, though, when you hear the politicians are saying that the president iseering to go over the cliff, some of that is posturing to maybe put some of the blame back on him. this is something that if the economy starts to suffer on this, people are going to look to blaming each other. i think that it's likely,
, they all had affairs. what do you say to that? >> well, i don't think the idea -- the problem is that general petraeus had an affair. i think the idea and the big problem is that he was director of the cia and he walked into right into one of the most blackmailable situations you can have. it's good the u.s. found out about it before the russians or chinese. it's not that he's a general messing around, and according to the code of the justice that's not allowed. >> teetering on the edge of the fiscal cliff with just 36 days to go until tax increases kick, in the white house and congress are playing a high stakes game of let's make a deal. >> only in america believes there has to be this what i believe to be really farcical now surely -- the nature of the world is very fast moving, america has huge economic problems, heading for another fiscal cliff, everyone laughing at you from afar, the american public sick and tired of all the games going on and there are you, grover norquist, a very bright guy still resolutely saying a pledge is a pledge is a pledge, it cannot be broken wh
this is a process. obviously, there's a lot of give and take going on now, but republicans don't want to see new revenues, in other words, democrat tax increases, be used for new spending. so that's sort of where many of our members have drawn the line now. >> that is where it times to be one of the big road blocks are right now, democrats -- you-all want to use what's known as chained cpi, which is a technical -- i won't get into it now but would effectively really affect social security recipients to replace the sequester, which is $100 billion in cuts and democrats want to use new revenue from tax increases to replace the sequester. is that where you see it? >> yeah, there are other issues involved but that's certainly one example of one where -- frankly, chained cpi, us to is not just about replace the sequester today it is putting in place a policy that will help save and protect social security in the long term. but that being said, if democrats don't accept that as an offset, then come up with something else because raising taxes to pay for new spending is not going that republicans belie
, as a professor once said, he was doing a lot. what he was really doing was keeping us out of war. and you don't get credit for things that don't happen. but he for eight years, got us out -- we were in korea when we got in, he got us out by bluffing, basically. >> brinksmanship. >> threatening to use the bomb and other things. then he spent the next eight years at a scary, dangerous time. the cold war is getting going, nuclear weapons are new things, communist threats all over the place. he basically bluffed our way through eight years. we didn't lose any soldiers, department get into any wars, stayed out of vietnam. >> the economy exploded, created the interstate system, invested in science. >> and balanced the budget while he was doing it. and there was huge pressure on him to spend more defense, and he was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking
but it is just too cold and the power is out and i don't like it when the power is out. >> i'm from iowa originally. i moved here about 30 years ago to get way from this. >> reporter: overnight, winds gusted to hurricane force on the jersey shore. they can't get a break after hurricane sandy. and thunder in new york central park. this weather system has impacted coast-to-coast, either the entire country getting snow, wind or rain or tornadoes. >> a lot of us heard that thunder in new york city. >> over 9300 flights have been cancelled or delayed by the storm and more problems today. erica hill is at laguardia's airport. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. up until 15, 20 minutes ago, there weren't many delays at laguardia. we're just learning there is a delay of an hour for inbound flights because of wind issues. almost 40 flights cancelled at new arc. over 350 flight cancellations so far this morning, most in the northeast, much better than the numbers yesterday where we saw more than 1600 flights cancelled because of this storm. many people are still stranded, trying to get home f
, and that could be a dangerous situation. again, we don't know where the clot is. it could also be in some of the veins around the head. we're still awaiting those details, suzanne. >> sanjay, from what we do know, do we suspect this is something that's very serious? >> given the fact that the initial concussion she was actually told she could stay at home. she went in for an exam yesterday. my guess is, given that it was on a sunday, it wasn't a routine exam. she may have had some particular thing she wanted to get checked out. now the doctors are saying that it will be 48 hours in the hospital, that fits, suzanne, with the amount of time it typically takes to put someone on blood thinners. so if that's the case, i think that all these things could potentially be serious, but from what we're hearing, they caught this in time. >> as secretary of state, she's visited more than 100 countries. it was back in 1998 as first lady, that i had a chance to travel with her. she had described it afterwards it was one of the most serious health scares she ever had because of a blood clot behind her kn
of the tornadoes and the snow today we had a repeat of it. the tornado threat i don't think as big as yesterday but it is still there. further off toward the east as the line right here continues to push off toward the east. it is very unstable ahead of it. i will show you that throeat ina second. the blizzard going on near the ohio and mississippi river right there south of paduka. that's the bulls eye. it will continue to go off to the northeast. anywhere you see this yellow from parts of virginia to central florida could see windy conditions. we could see tornadoes. i think the bullseye of tornadoes is where this moderate risk is across south and north carolina. that will be later on this afternoon. we have blizzard warnings in effect. darker red is blizzards reduce visibility quarter of a mile. 3-6 inches in additional snow around the ped duaducah area. the bullseye will be well over a foot. coastal areas mostly rain. start with a little snow transitioning over to rain. you will be dealing with a lot of snow this evening and all day tomorrow. guys? >> rick, thank you very much. you have bee
. >> imagine. that's very encouraging to people. to know that if your first 10 books don't sell, that's okay. but i think it says something about your determination. >> mulish obstinate sea. they think it is a fact that because a lot of people start writing a novel, particularly journalists have a novel in the jury. when you start writing your first novel is a new experience you get the names and say you have brown eyes and then you get to page 50 or 100 probably nobody's ever going to read this. when i got to that stage, i thought the heck with that. i'll finish the thing. they have that streak of obstinate sea this is now going going to finish it. >> in the news business were discouraged from making things better. and of course you have to make everything out. [laughter] >> almost everything. ever since i is benito, the first book i researched. i was born in 1949 so i have no memories and so i had to find out what everyday life is like during the war for people in the u.k., which is for the story of a set. so i researched it and never sent then i realized that that works for me to write a
. >> thanks, don. >> stories that captured attention this year. crime, politics, money, the most scandalous stories of the year. the top 10 of 2012 tuesday night, christmas night at 7:00 eastern right here on cnn. as i said yesterday, i know you'll like it. i'm anchoring it. that's a joke. don't take me seriously, y'all. it is a good show. i'm don lemon at cnn headquarters in atlanta. see you back here at 10:00 p.m. eastern. "tough decisions," a fareed zakaria special begins in four seconds. >>> the great french writer albert camus said life is a sum of all your choices. we are all defined by the decisions we make every day. we make hundreds of them. paper or plastic, chicken or fish. most are mundane and require little thought, but others are agonizing, often life-altering. then there are the decisions made by leaders. some of which have changed the course of history -- for better and some for worse. july 1776, the american founding fathers' decision to declare independence. january 1863, abraham lincoln's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolph hitler's decisi
but it's absolutely going to be a huge fight going forward. >> it it makes it to the floor? >> i don't think it will make it. i think the house republicans, there are not 218 votes as congress stands right now and if president obama wants to engage congress on this, it will be an uphill battle for him. >> let's listen to chuck schumer responding to wayne lapierre's comments on the press. >> i think he's so extreme and so tone deaf that he actually helps the cause of us passing sensible gun legislation in the congress. >> friday's comments, yesterday's interview, what's your thought here? was he handling the sensitivity properly here? >> when the nra entered the fray on friday, they introduced a different topic into the conversation we'd been talking a lot about gun control, mental health issues and here we have a new topic of arming more people in schools. so i think this might be a more divisive part of the conversation and kind of might rile up some democrats to be opposing them. >> jake, you know, lapierre was very clear in his messaging over the weekend as well as on friday and k
. barnicle, what gifts did you give? >> i give a gift that you don't have to assemble to everyone in my family. i give myself. that's it. that's all you get. all right? and that is all you get right now. >> boo! >> this is harsh. this is harsh. all right. "morning joe" starts right now. >>> make no mistake about it, if we go over it, god forbid, and i still don't think we have to, the american people are going to blame the republican party, and they'll come right back and pass something. so i don't think the middle class is at risk. because if we go over the cliff, our republican colleagues are going to come back and say uh-oh and then pass the bill we passed in the senate already. >> i think $250,000 is too low a threshold. a lot of working people who are couples would exceed that, and i don't think we need that kind of shock to the system. however, i've talked to some of my democratic colleagues, and they are saying maybe in the $400,000 or $500,000 category, we could set a benchmark. i do think it is essential that we start talking about what amount can be passed on a bipartisan basi
board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a lot of interest in obama. then to pull back. >> but there were people on the right to and those who would disagree to say he apologizes for america and pulls out from the allies and those that say he should not send t
, with the passage of don't ask and don't tell, we have that particular partner going on as well. and so, they are also embraced as far as being part of the, uh, the family as well. and even the veterans administration, i think, is looking very carefully at their definition of family even now, and trying to determine what is the best way to capture those individuals who are, are in a person's life who have an emotional attachment and who are so important for their support. and, i think, the unique circumstances of the past decade at war, in terms of the nature of the conflicts, has also sort of, really pushed that, that issue to the forefront with regard to military members, um, are often married to other military members. so, when you have, um, multiple deployment, sometimes both parents deployed, um, really the definition of who is assuming a lot of these family roles is changing. it can be other members of the community, um, very often it's children that are assuming a lot of the parental responsibilities, if you will, um, in the face of both parents being deployed or one parent being
to be american, and we don't want it. >> and we don't want to cash in our chips, but that's the final hand. our thanks to all of our guests for being here and to you for watching. on behalf of all the folks at "ac 360" and cnn, i'm tom foreman wishing you all of the best and none of the worst in 2013. x xx x >>> tonight, finding faith and purpose this holiday season. >> there's so much bad news in the world. we need good news. >> america's pastor rick warren joins me. >> people say i fell out of love. that's your choice. >> he talks religion, reason, and what america needs now. >> the good life isn't good enough. what you need is the better life. >> the election, the economy, same-sex marriage and more, to the issues that really matter. >> you know why we have to change the constitution? it was a flawed document. it was made by men. >> what does god mean to you? this is "piers morgan tonight." >> good evening, and happy holidays and welcome to a special "piers morgan tonight." joining me, one of the most influential spiritual leaders in the world, rick warren. he's america's pastor. we're going
guest of all . new survey said one family most people don't want at the christmas table. let us know your thoughts. "fox and friends" begins right now. >> this is scotty knox, you are watching "fox and friends", happy holidays, what? i am the only one? >> that's how we talk around here. >> gretchen: it is christmas eve. we have clayton morris . rich -- rick with us. >> it is the first time. i only have done it one other time. >> it will be great and we have great for you . we'll talk about what is coming up on the fiscal cliff. have you got your holiday shopping done yet? are you done? >> gretchen: i am waiting for three things to come in the mail that they might not arrive. >> i an alert said winter weather causing shipping delays. >> if you are worried about your packages in christmas eve, you delayed yourself. >> gretchen: blame the weather guy. l>> i ordered it on friday. >> gretchen: merry christmas . still no deal in sight just more of the same way blame game . e week before the taxes are going to sky rocket. steve is live in washington. >> good morning, gretchen and everybody.
. and ask yourselves what are the lessons of history? i don't study history because it's an interesting habit, i study history to better understand the present and the future so that i can be engaged in making history by being an intelligent, informed perp. that's what citizenship ought to be. and so what are some of the lessons? now, let me start with the fiscal cliff. and i'd ask a simple, obvious question. this is a very sophisticated group. how many of you have heard the term "fiscal cliff"? [laughter] okay. now, i want to say something which in washington will be seen at heretical and as gingrich once again going off and doing things that make no sense like the contract with america, balanced budget, i've participateed in my career with reagan's supply-side economics. i'm proud of the number of things i've participated in that made no sense in washington. [laughter] there is no fiscal cliff. this is absolute, total nonsenses. the best way to understand what happens to all of us is to read a great essay by tom wolfe, thomas wolfe enentitled mar mowing the flak catchers. this goes ba
, freaking them out when they don't expect it. >> they don't expect frosty to move around. >> at one point the cameraman says, can you fix this for me? >> they still are surprised. i love this couple. tells you a lot about their relationship. >> bailed on her, left her to the snowman. >> pushed her toward it. >> protect your woman. >> he's not going to take a bullet for you, honey. i love this one in slow motion. >> i love when this little kid comes up to him. >> he was nice to the little guy. >> see, this is why we like rich. >> just be nice to the little ones. >> need to send a belated christmas gift? we have just the thing. >> hello and welcome to fart by mail. >> how you can let one rip miles away. >> home alone doggie style. >> i love these fun toys that come out once a year. >> see what the >>> just in time for christmas, the perfect way to tell someone special they are, in fact, special to you. >> hello and welcome to fart by mail. >> did i hear him say fart by mail? this is a new way to let someone know they are important to you. you can send them flatulence by mail. >> like an act
but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct the pastness of the past that is so close to us. and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our common sense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demiesfy, demythologize, to move beyond the cliches about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is to tell a different story, one grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of antique funhouse mirror which if i looked at it long enough would reflect back to me, often in hazy, indistinct, distorted forms, images of events, people, places which organized and arranged told the story of 20th century america. as a historian, i'm interested in origin, so i will tell you about the origin of this book. i was a colleague of arthur schlessinger or at the city university of new york. h
and saying, we love roon, we don't want anything bad to happen to roon, but he's got to move on because things are not getting done. cnn was on the table at that point. they become successful. nbc was on the rise, had taken over number one. they said you have a replacement. so i spent a year and a half or so looking for a suitable replacement for this legend. i tried inside and outside. essentially i pulled a dick cheney. and i said to my boss, i sub-optimizing do we can do but do they want to do. i know these people, i've worked with him as the lawyer and her boss. am not sure what to do. he said i think you can do but i'm not sure you want to. we talked about over two or three months and end up going in. i went going in as a good corporate citizen because i valued abc news. it needed to help. i thought i would give her two years or so. the great shock to me was i really came to love it. sort of a convert in the journalism. it was a remarkable experience and they really inspirational experience for me. >> tell me about the trials and trouble haitians of president bill clinton. you're c
there was no mention of an alternative possibility. they serve american lives because it is about the fanatics, you don't hear but the russian side of the equation and the other traces that could be had. >> it stirs up controversy and i wonder if we could move on to some of the areas that they argue have already elicited the commentary on different sides. the cold war is essential to when you write about here and to the film, and perhaps as i read it your argument mentions that the united states is primarily to blame, that stalin and the soviets would have been open to a new welcoming continuation of the wartime alliance between the two countries, but it was the american actions primarily. some allies, the british for example, which leader of a wanted gold for. is that an adequate portrayal? >> guest: i would say that's accurate. we certainly don't consider the stalin to be blameless in all of this and we certainly don't downplay the brutality or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under the leadership. i think it's important to factor in, but look at the broad sweep of t
don't have to join a gym or buy a horse as the kay may be. you just have to get your hands on the finest piece of exercise equipment to be thrust on the fitness scene and on "the ridiculist." >> you can see number seven tomorrow night. that does it for this edition of "ac360." >>> "outfront" next, just six days until we all fall over the fiscal cliff and tonight, there's no action on capitol hill. will that change by the end of the year? tonight, two congressmen come "outfront" to talk specifics. plus, arizona's attorney general backs a plan reminiscent of the nra to arm school principles. does more guns in schools begin to add up? and the biggest political fumbles. the best of the worst from our the best of the worst from our politicians. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> i'm in for erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, christmas is over. washington back to work. the countydown is on. the clock is ticking. you've got six days to prevent this country from going over the fiscal cliff and today at least, we didn't see any action. nothing. nothing, nada. now, i'm not tryin
's a surprise on the way. they don't know it, but santa is going to visit. >> making his way down the chimney, i believe, as we speak. we are pretaping the show, so we can be home with our families and loved ones. >>> we want to start, live, with the top stories developing right now. >> merry christmas, everyone. many people are waking up to a white christmas this morning. it is a blessing for the kids. for the adults, well, some conditions are causing christmas chaos. here's abc's rob nelson. >> reporter: no dreaming necessary this year. it is going to be a white christmas for large portions of the u.s., from new england to california's sierra mountains. >> this is as white as we want it to be. >> reporter: but for many, it's turned their simple over the river and through the woods holiday trip, into a chaotic travel nightmare. >> we are hoping we don't sit on the runway. >> reporter: it's no picnic for the little travelers, either. >> want to get there. we're going to be late. come on. >> reporter: a storm is forecast to hit oklahoma this morning. the midwest will see themselves socked with sn
. what else can we do? we don't have any medical training which kind of -- okay, you are fire fighters, i figured you had some. that was my naivete at the moment, i think i was a little overwhelmed myself. that's still my on-going project as far as that goes, how can we raise some funds and i actually have a bunch of paramedics that would go over there in a heartbeat on their time if we could find a way to fund it to teach them the medicine. the reality is they don't have a health care system now. it's slowly coming back but it was wiped out. they had the tertiary care facility in the region. they were the closest thing to a trauma center. they were the closest thing to intensive care. when we were there, the nearest surgery was 400 kilometers away and they don't have helicopters, not so much. there's a few owned by the military. so it was a long ride. as a matter of fact, we thought about that as we were stopped on a highway and people were barreling at us, i thought, wow, 400 kilometers is a long way if something goes wrong here. but it puts it all in perspective. their heal
really well. >> and hot boots. >> charcoal booty, comfortable, not too high. >> if you don't want a dress, that's a great a a alternative. >> our next model is lee ann. we have a lot of metallics and layering of jewelry and this is more of a classic body. a shashana dress. easy, bra friendly and fun with a sparkle and we layered jewelry, the ring, teal. good pop of color there. >> thank you very much. this is cleopatra. >> yes. this is a fan favorite, this dress. this has been so much fun. spin around and show the back. >> wow! >> love the back. >> va-va-voom. >> a stunning dress, definitely a statement piece. >> she wears it well. >> yes. it's comfortable, it's not form fitted. this is an awesome piece, definitely one of our favorites. >> that is great. you look gorgeous in that. thank you very much. this is breaking up the block coloring here. >> a couple of key trends here. the metallic and sparkle and this is also very, very comfortable dress and spin you around and we have the cut-outs. >> can we move her hair? >> yes also another fun trend. cut-outs are big for the spring, as well s
by everyone. i'm scared. i'm not going to lie. but i have faith. >> i don't think you can prepare for. this live for today. >> the house backs up to the wetlands. the water rushed through the basement and started to come up here through the first floor. there was so much, ten feet, that this was the water line. their lives and this christmas season would never be the same. >> you spent 22 christmass here? >> 22. yes. >> volunteers helped to gut the house. >> webb this, you can still have a christmas? >> always. because christmas is family. christmas is love. christmas could be a tree this big or this big. it could be in this corner or it could be in a hotel room. it's family, it's love. it's hope. it's god. >> kylie used a donated gift card to buy a tiny tree for their hotel room. small symbol of the outpouring of support and money from the people. the charity one small wish helped them furnish the tetch rare home they are now renting. >> it's important to have something to call your own. this is home. a lot of people are living in hotel, shelters and living with other people. there i
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a bill too. we passed a bill that does the same thing. why don't you just take our bill and go ahead and get it through? we need your help. >> they could well do that. the bill that has the $250,000 or below. it's interesting now that essentially here we have speaker boehner walking away saying well the senate has to act. they can do whatever. we're going to say on vacation. who does harry reid have to negotiate with them? where does he go? >> the president and harry reid can only negotiate so much. >> the question becomes if they can get a bill for 250 and below perhaps with the unemployment insurance attached to it, maybe put in sweetener with the estate tax, could they guarantee that would pass the house of representatives? from the statement we do not know that. >> jared, last week it was speaker boehner himself who could not get his own bill passed, the plan "b." and yet here he is trying to put it back on democrats and the president to get the bill passed making it clear they're not prepared to come back to washington and do anything to avoid the fiscal cliff. what do you think
, i don't recall how i made it back across that bridge to the church. but after i got back to the church, the church was full to capacity, more than 2,000 people on the outside trying to get in to protest what had happened on the bridge. and someone asked me to say something to the audience. and i stood up and said something like: "i don't understand it, how president johnson can send troops to vietnam but cannot send troops to selma, alabama, to protect people whose only desire is to register to vote." the next thing i knew, i had been admitted to the local hospital in selma. amy goodman: explain that moment where you decided to move forward, because i don't think the history we learn records those small acts that are actually gargantuan acts of bravery. talk about-i mean, you saw the weapons the police arrayed against you. what propelled you forward, congressmember lewis? rep. john lewis: well, my mother, my father, my grandparents, my uncles and aunts, and people all around me had never registered to vote. i had been working all across the south. the state of mississippi
and kept working on it. as a freshman member of the congress, i don't have the pull or the power to say when we're going to be there, when we're not but i will say this, that the u.s. house of representatives has acted. we're waiting for the senate to act and i believe that as soon as they act we'll be back in town to find some forge -- some pathway forward. >> well, a senior white house official told cnn tonight to that point, they said we believe strongly a reasonable package can get majorities in both houses. the only thing that would prevent it is if speaker mcconnell and speaker boehner don't cooperate. do you think mcconnell and boehner are in the mood to cooperate with president obama? >> i do believe they're in a mood to cooperate. they've talked -- and speaker boehner's talked for a long time about a grand bargain, about a big deal, about trying to find some major solution going forward. but the senate hasn't acted on anything, so i think we have to be careful on just placing the blame on mcconnell or boehner. without adding in to this mix, senator harry reid who is running the
, you don't understand. he was want trying to single out for know. he was trying to get for all of the states. i wanted to get an opt out in case the state wanted to opt out. finally the supreme court gave that. but it got used against me while i was drying something that i shouldn't have. and actually i was not. and the interesting thing is i was asked to do this by the nebraska governor, and i did finally get an thank you from another governor from another state. >> that wasn't the so-called kickback. >> that's right. >> during the time you experienced the radio talk show host circuit and the table tv circuit. what was the period like? what do you think that echo chamber in american policy today does for the system? >> the echo chamber is a difficult thing to deal with it. it's not just broadcast, it's the blogs, the tweets, all the electronic communications today. whey found . >> that's been during the twelve years. in 2000 we didn't have . >> that's right. suddenly, you know, and i think i was prepared for what would happen with that i certainly wasn't. as a matter of fact i
questions before he and as opposed to asking questions they don't know about to get a more natural response? >>guest: i always do the latter and prepare a great deal to have a long list of questions. it is more valuable to have that spontaneous exchange. . . reading your book, maybe i am reading in to this but did you talk with the queen in crafting your book? >> well, the queen, as a policy and is probably sensible from her standpoint, which is that in her entire 60 year reign she has never given an interview and that has helped probably to preserve her mystique and is kept her from having to pick and choose who she might give interviews to. i was lucky to meet her three times and private social settings and i describe her three times in the book. at each of them was brief, but revelatory and in each case it gave little glimpses of that private side, that gaiety of spirit, the flash of wit and so, they were very valuable to me. i also watched her a lot in different settings. i traveled with her overseas. i traveled with her around the u.k. so i could see how she interacted with people. in
were fanatics. you don't hear the russian side of the equation and the choices that could be had. >> these books have to stand up to controversy and i wonder if we could cover the areas that obviously -- the story is -- has already elicited commentary. and as i read it, your argument is that the united states is primarily to blame for the beginning of the cold war, that stalin and the soviets would have been open to -- were welcoming a continuation of the wartime alliance between the two countries but it was american actions primarily, with in allies, british, for example, which were involved in the cold war. is that accurate? >> i'd say that is accurate. certainly don't consider stalin blameless in all of this, and certainly don't downplay stalin's brutality or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. we think that's important to factor in but if you look at the broad sweep of the history of the united states' relationship with the soviet union, beginning in 1917-1918, when the united states first went to the soviet union, as
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